Fall 2017 American Studies Courses

Courses are listed by campus.

AMST 1201: Introduction to American Studies

Mo We  4:40-5:55pm, #8003

Our major theme for this particular section will be 20th century social movements in the United States – left and right – and how these movements have been shaped by the world outside U.S. borders.  Situating the U.S. in a global context, we will use literature, photography, radio broadcasts, visual art, political manifestos, and secondary historical works to examine diverse historical phenomena such as the Great Depression, Cold War geopolitics, Keynesian and neoliberal economics, immigration, industrialization and de-industrialization, American socialism and American fascism, racism and racial justice movements, the “new left” and the “new right,” and the Vietnam War.  

Professor: Chris Vials

AMST 1201: Introduction to American Studies  

TuTh 9:30-10:45am; ACD 301, #12342

McKenzie’s AMST 1201 investigates coastal southern New England as a distinct place. Using history, art, economics, natural sciences, anthropology, and tourism studies, this section of AMST 1201 will explore the intersecting forces that shaped this unique region over the past 5 centuries.

Professor: Matthew McKenzie

AMST 1201: Introduction to American Studies

Mo We 4:40-5:55pm, #13431, HPL 25

What is an American? A multi-disciplinary inquiry into the diversity of American societies and cultures.

Professor: TBA

TBA

Stamford contact: Mary Cygan

AMST 1201: Introduction to American Studies

Mo We 9:05-10:20 am, #13909

What is an American? American Studies addresses this question but examines the American Experience from a variety of academic disciplines. While we cannot examine the whole of U.S. history in one semester, what we can do is look at several aspects of our nation’s journey, and study our country’s development from different perspectives. We will examine against the backdrop of the U.S. Constitution, History, Ethics, Political Science, Political Speech, Art, Literature, Film, Law and Journalism..

Professor: Thomas Hogan